How to Measure Pants & Shirts

Here’s a simple picture based how-to on how to measure an existing pair of pants and shirt.

Waist

Measuring directly off your existing pants is a bit off putting as it may be a lot bigger than your actual size. Don’t use this measurement as your actual measurement. But, this is a good way to see how much you differ from you actual measurement for a particular brand. These pants measure as 35 inches.

waist

Pant Length

Measure the pant length by the side seam from the top of the waist to the bottom of the cuff. These pants measure at 39 inches.

pantl2

 

pantl1

Inseam

Place the tape measure at the center crotch seam and measure to the bottom of the cuff. These pants measure at 29 inches.

inseam

Crotch

Measuring the crotch can be tricky, so ensure that you double check your measurements). It is recommended that you measure the back rise and front rise separately, using the middle crotch seam as your start and end point respectively. Here the front rise is 10.5 inches and the back rise is 14 inches for a total of 25 inches.

crotch1

crotch2

Thigh (Knee is optional)

Measure from the center crotch seam to the side seam. For this pant, the thigh measurement is 22 inches.

thigh

Pant Cuffs

Measure at the bottom of the pants from seam to seam. This cuff size is 16, making these pants a regular, straight legged pant.

pantcuff1

Neck

Measure the neck collar by placing the measuring tape from the top button to the other top button. This shirt’s neck size measures at 17 inches. Refer to: How to Measure a Jacket for instructions on measuring the sleeve, back, chest, stomach and hips and shoulder.

collar size

Complete Guide to Shirt & Pant Measurements

Waist

Now that you’re fully equipped on measuring a blazer by following this guide, we can move on to the exciting world of measuring pants.

Pants are fairly straight forward to measure, especially when it comes to figuring out your ready to wear size. Retailers typically show size as “30×30″ or “32×34″ where the first number is waist and the second number is pant length or out-seam. As mentioned earlier in blazer measurements, it’s not uncommon for retailers to add in up to 6 inches to pants that are listed as size 30. Don’t believe it? Check out this comparison chart done by Esquire.

waistline-measurement-chart-for-men-090710-xlg

Typically, you should expect atleast 1.5 inches of vanity sizing, although the likes of H&M and Zara (European or Asian brands) may have a smaller size bias. Basically, there is no set criteria for vanity sizing as every brand has its own way of going about it.

This is also based on whether the pant is a casual or formal styled pant. For dress pants or pants that come with suits, typically the sizing is based on a “6 inch drop”. This refers to the chest size to waist size ratio, if the chest size is 38, than the pant waist size will be a 32. Casual pants are typically worn 3 inches below the belly button, while dress pants are typically worn at the belly button. Although recent styles show that even formal pants are worn lower, adding to the confusion on size.

The beauty of pant sizing is that it all can be solved with a good belt assuming the pants are slightly loose!

Ensure that you measure while wearing an existing pant that you have that fits you well. This will allow you to see where the pants comfortably sit on you (belly button or 3 inches below your belly button). Here is how to measure your waist.

Pant Length

As mentioned last week, retailers typically size pants as “30×30″ or “32×34″ where the first number is waist and the second number is pant length or “out-seam”. This second number is typically true, the vanity sizing only seems to pertain to width and not height. In most cases, if you’re shorter than average, you’ll have to get your pants continually hemmed. Unlike dress pants which have a solid rule of ensuring there is a “break” (crease) between you knee and ankle, casual pants have no solid rule. Having said that, casual pants look better slightly longer than shorter (unless you’re deliberately trying to rock a semi-hipster in the summer look with no socks. A short, casual pant that is not trying to be ironic will make you look like you’re in a flood.

Ensure to measure to the floor and subtract 1. To be very precise on the length, measure the space from the floor to the cuff (which is the width of your shoe), and subtract that number. Ensure that when measuring, you’re wearing the pants with the shoes that you would typically be wearing the pants with. Here’s how to measure pant length.

Inseam

The inseam measurement refers to your inner pant length and can be a bit tricky to measure. Unless you’re working with an experienced tailor, its best that you hold the tip of the measuring tape at your crotch where it’s most comfortable. The tape measure then goes down to the floor and again, you subtract one. It’s best to subtract the same amount you did as the pant length. This measurement is typically around 10 inches smaller than your pant length, but not exactly.

 Crotch

The crotch is another tricky measurement. Essentially, the measuring tape must go between your legs comfortably, to measure the front rise and back rise. Typically, your front rise (front waist to crotch) is smaller than your back rise (crotch to back waist).

Thigh & Knee

Thigh measurement is a very straight forward measurement. Simply place the measurement around the highest point at which your crotch meets your legs. A similar measurement is optionally done for the knee (around the middle of the knee), yet it is not necessary since the pants are usually sewn straight based on the thigh width to the cuff width.

Pant Cuffs

The pant cuff is a very important measurement as it determines if your pants are baggy, straight or skinny. This typically ranges between 12 inches (super skinny), regular (15 to 16 inches) and wide leg (17 to 18 inches). Currently, style and trend suit a straight to skinny pant, however this is completely dependent on body type as large thighs will favor a wide leg pant.

Neck

The neck measurement is really important as most ready to wear shirt sizing is based on the neck measurement. Thankfully, there is no vanity sizing added to the neck measurement. Retailers and brands understand that a collar should fit exactly and properly when buttoned up and worn with a tie, and so its easier to buy shirts from all brands with one size.

When measuring your neck size, lift up the collar of your favorite shirt and measure around the neck, specifically around the Adam’s apple. Ensure that you leave 2 fingers between the measuring tape and your neck so you account for the room you’ll need to breathe!

Here’s how to measure your neck:

Please refer to the guide to jacket measurements for chest, sleeve, waist, hip and back measurements for the shirt.

 

 

Guide to Shirt Measurements: Neck

The neck measurement is really important as most ready to wear shirt sizing is based on the neck measurement. Thankfully, there is no vanity sizing added to the neck measurement. Retailers and brands understand that a collar should fit exactly and properly when buttoned up and worn with a tie, and so its easier to buy shirts from all brands with one size.

When measuring your neck size, lift up the collar of your favorite shirt and measure around the neck, specifically around the Adam’s apple. Ensure that you leave 2 fingers between the measuring tape and your neck so you account for the room you’ll need to breathe!

Here’s how to measure your neck:

Here’s how to measure off an existing shirt:

collar size

 

Please refer to the guide to jacket measurements for chest, sleeve, waist, hip and back measurements.

Guide to Measurements: Pant cuffs

The pant cuff is a very important measurement as it determines if your pants are baggy, straight or skinny. This typically ranges between 12 inches (super skinny), regular (15 to 16 inches) and wide leg (17 to 18 inches). Currently, style and trend suit a straight to skinny pant, however this is completely dependent on body type as large thighs will favor a wide leg pant.

Here’s how to measure pant cuffs:

Here’s how to measure pant cuffs off an existing pair of pants. This cuff size is 16, so its a regular width.

pantcuff1

Guide to Measurements – Thigh & Optionally: Knee

Thigh measurement is a very straight forward measurement. Simply place the measurement around the highest point at which your crotch meets your legs. A similar measurement is optionally done for the knee (around the middle of the knee), yet it is not necessary since the pants are usually sewn straight based on the thigh width to the cuff width.

Here is how to measure off an existing pair of pants.

thigh

Guide to Measurements: Crotch

The crotch is another tricky measurement. Essentially, the measuring tape must go between your legs comfortably, to measure the front rise and back rise. Typically, your front rise (front waist to crotch) is smaller than your back rise (crotch to back waist).

Here is how to measure off existing pants (although this can also be quite tricky, so ensure that you double check). Ensure to measure both back rise and front rise separately, using the middle crotch seam as your start and point respectively.

crotch1

crotch2

Guide to Pant Measurements: Inseam

The inseam measurement refers to your inner pant length and can be a bit tricky to measure. Unless you’re working with an experienced tailor, its best that you hold the tip of the measuring tape at your crotch where it’s most comfortable. The tape measure then goes down to the floor and again, you subtract one. It’s best to subtract the same amount you did as the pant length. This measurement is typically around 10 inches smaller than your pant length, but not exactly.

Here is how to measure the inseam on existing pants:

inseam

Guide to Measurements: Pant Length

As mentioned last week, retailers typically size pants as “30×30″ or “32×34″ where the first number is waist and the second number is pant length or “out-seam”. This second number is typically true, the vanity sizing only seems to pertain to width and not height. In most cases, if you’re shorter than average, you’ll have to get your pants continually hemmed. Unlike dress pants which have a solid rule of ensuring there is a “break” (crease) between you knee and ankle, casual pants have no solid rule. Having said that, casual pants look better slightly longer than shorter (unless you’re deliberately trying to rock a semi-hipster in the summer look with no socks. A short, casual pant that is not trying to be ironic will make you look like you’re in a flood.

Here’s how to measure length, be sure to measure to the floor and subtract 1. To be very precise on the length, measure the space from the floor to the cuff (which is the width of your shoe), and subtract that number. Ensure that when measuring, you’re wearing the pants with the shoes that you would typically be wearing the pants with.

Here’s how to measure an existing pair of pants:

pantl2

pantl1

 

Guide to Pant Measurements: Waist

Now that you’re fully equipped on measuring a blazer by following this guide, we can move on to the exciting world of measuring pants.

Pants are fairly straight forward to measure, especially when it comes to figuring out your ready to wear size. Retailers typically show size as “30×30″ or “32×34″ where the first number is waist and the second number is pant length or out-seam. As mentioned earlier in blazer measurements, it’s not uncommon for retailers to add in up to 6 inches to pants that are listed as size 30. Don’t believe it? Check out this comparison chart done by Esquire.

waistline-measurement-chart-for-men-090710-xlg

Typically, you should expect atleast 1.5 inches of vanity sizing, although the likes of H&M and Zara (European or Asian brands) may have a smaller size bias. Basically, there is no set criteria for vanity sizing as every brand has its own way of going about it.

This is also based on whether the pant is a casual or formal styled pant. For dress pants or pants that come with suits, typically the sizing is based on a “6 inch drop”. This refers to the chest size to waist size ratio, if the chest size is 38, than the pant waist size will be a 32. Casual pants are typically worn 3 inches below the belly button, while dress pants are typically worn at the belly button. Although recent styles show that even formal pants are worn lower, adding to the confusion on size.

The beauty of pant sizing is that it all can be solved with a good belt assuming the pants are slightly loose!

Here is how to measure your waist. Ensure that you measure while wearing an existing pant that you have that fits you well. This will allow you to see where the pants comfortably sit on you (belly button or 3 inches below your belly button).

Measuring directly off your existing pants is a bit off putting as it may be a lot bigger than your actual size.  Don’t use this measurement as your actual measurement. But, this is a good way to see how much you differ from you actual measurement for a particular brand.

waist

 

How to Measure your Jacket

- - Guide to Measurements

Sometimes, you don’t have anyone to help you measure yourself but you do have a jacket that fits you really well. Here is a simple guide on how to measure an existing jacket. Before you get started, you will need:

  • A flexible measuring tape
  • A flat surface
  • A pen and paper to record your measurements

Chest Measurement

Simply wrap the measuring tape around the chest at the seam where the armpits meet, without stretching the tape and keeping the first button, buttoned. Don’t be alarmed if the jacket is not the ready chest size that you bought, brands usually put 2 to 4 inches of extra allowance. This jacket however, has no allowance.

photo (55)

Jacket Length

Simply place the measuring tape at the highest part of shoulder seam and measure to the end of the jacket.

photo (61)

Stomach Measurement

Simply place your measuring tape across the second button on the jacket and measure from end to end, then multiply by 2.

photo (63)

Sleeve Length

Measure the sleeve from the back (close to to the elbow) to get the full length.

photo 4 (3)

Hip Measurement

Simply measure the bottom of the jacket and multiply by 2.

photo 1 (5)

Shoulder Measurement

Simply place the measuring tape across the back, from shoulder seam to shoulder seam.

photo 2 (11)

Back Measurement

Only measure from the back seam to back seam indicated by the black lines in the picture below. Do not measure right across like you would with other measurements.  If you did it right, the back measurement should be slightly smaller than the shoulder measurement (anatomically, your shoulders are wider than your back). In this case, for this size 38 regular jacket, the shoulder is 17 and the back measurement is 15.

back_measurement